Blog

Sandhill Crane Counts – Week 8

Andrew Caven, Lead Biologist

Given low cloud ceilings and morning fog we missed week 7 of surveys this year. However, we squeaked out week 8; this past Tuesday morning we were up before sunrise and completed a count. We counted 117,000 Sandhill Cranes with a relative…

Sandhill Crane Counts – Week 6

Andrew Caven, Lead Biologist

Our aerial count for this week are 208,600, with an absolute error of +/-12.9%. We had a mechanical malfunction on the plane before takeoff and had to change a light. This set us back about 20 minutes in terms of start time; this…

Sandhill Crane Counts – Week 5

Andrew Caven, Lead Biologist

Our aerial count for this week was 404,000, with an absolute error of +/-8.6%. It was cold and bumpy this week, but better conditions for counting than the last. Overcast skies delayed the start and we had a number of birds in the…

Sandhill Crane Counts – Week 4

Andrew Caven, Lead Biologist

Our aerial count for this Wednesday morning was 406,000, with an absolute error of +/-13.5%. We had a strong tail wind this morning and flew the route at a significantly faster pace than usual, forcing us to count a large number of…

Sandhill Crane Counts – Week 3

Andrew Caven, Lead Biologist

Our aerial count for this week was 194,825 Sandhill Cranes (Relative Error: -7.3%; so our reported number is likely a little bit low). SACRs were present in survey bridge segment one (Chapman, NE) to segment 8 just east of Kearney, NE. Cranes were…

Sandhill Crane Counts – Week 2

Andrew Caven, Lead Biologist

Our aerial count this week was 66,000 Sandhill Cranes (Absolute Error +/- 7.1%). SACRs were present in survey bridge segments 1, 3, and 4 in large roosts with the vast majority off of Mormon Island at the Crane Trust. We also detected a…

Sandhill Crane Counts – Week 1

Andrew Caven, Lead Biologist

The Crane Trust is back to flying the 90 mile route from Chapman, NE to Overton, NE. Our aerial count for the morning of Monday, February 13th, was 8,146 Sandhill Cranes. These were almost exclusively in bridge segment three (of eleven) from HWY 281…

Seven Years of Research Pays Off

Since 2012, the Crane Trust has been an important partner along with the USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center and the Platte River Recovery and Implementation Program in a research project studying Whooping Crane migratory habitat. This project is nicknamed the ‘Stopover Project,’ because it specifically describes the locations…

Meet the Crane Trust Photo Workshop Instructors

In 2017 the Crane Trust developed a new and creative way to support it’s conservation efforts: All-inclusive Photo Workshops. These workshops are an exciting new way to allow guests onto private Crane Trust lands to photograph one of nature’s oldest and largest migrations of over half-a-million Sandhill Cranes as they arrive…

Restored Habitat: Banking on Selective Seed Collecting

Article by: Joshua Wiese, Biological Technician

As we ended our first season of permanent biological monitoring in the fall of 2015, I felt like everyone on our conservation team’s appreciation for the landscape was evolving. Every one of us pursued conservation because we are steadfast in…